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Sexual Assault & Violence Reporting People Served

Sexual assault, dating violence, and domestic violence can happen to anyone. A 2019 Association of American Universities survey on sexual assault and misconduct polled over 150,000 students at 27 universities. The data revealed 13% of the students had been impacted by some form of nonconsensual sexual assault.

The Women's Center provides resources, advocacy, and services to all students of all genders, gender identities, including men and transgender. We work with survivors of all races, religions, incomes, languages, abilities, ethnicities, and sexual orientations. However, we recognize that there are some communities who have been disproportionately or differently impacted by sexual assault/interpersonal violence and their access to services.

The Women's Center is committed to serving all students by providing accessible, free, culturally competent, and confidential advocacy and services to all survivors and their allies.

Below is a beginning list of communities. This is a not an exhaustive list. Our goals are to continue building connections and to help students understand that everyone deserves support, and the Women's Center is here to help:

Active Military and Student Veterans

Serving active military and student veterans

Military sexual trauma (MST) is the term that the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) uses to refer to sexual assault or repeated threatening sexual harassment that occurred while the veteran was in the military. It includes any sexual activity where someone is involved against their will--they may have been pressured into sexual activities (for example, with threats of negative consequences for refusing to be sexually cooperative or with implied faster promotions or better treatment in exchange for sex), may have been unable to consent to sexual activities (for example, when intoxicated), or may have been physically forced into sexual activities.

The impact of interpersonal violence (stalking, relationship abuse, and sexual violence) effects all people regardless of their identity.

When sexual assault occurs it is devastating to the victim regardless of sex and/or gender. All victims have the same rights under the law, women and men. Survivors of sexual violence often blame themselves for the attack(s). Men, in particular, may feel that they should have been strong enough to defend themselves against the assault. Others may feel that they are at fault if they do not say "No".

Here at ODU, we have a population which includes active military personnel and student veterans that have a unique set of needs and have dealt with a number of things that many civilian students have never had to deal with. The Women's Center recognizes these differences and is committed to serving veterans and military-connected students by providing accessible, free, culturally competent, and confidential advocacy to all survivors and their allies.

Concerns

All survivors that use the Women's Center's services have the right to respectful treatment.

If you have experienced sexual trauma while on active duty or when returning to civilian life the Women's Center can help identify and connect you to the services and offices both on and off campus that can best help you in your unique situation.


On-campus resources for active military and student veterans

Military Connection Center
1106 Monarch Hall
Norfolk, VA 23529
757-683-7153 (office)
military@odu.edu

Women's Center - sexual and relationship violence victim advocacy, crisis intervention, education, and outreach.
1000 Webb University Center
Norfolk, VA 23529
757-683-4109 (office)
757-683-4111 (advocate)
womenctr@odu.edu

Counseling Services - confidential and supportive counseling for sexual assault, dating/domestic violence and stalking victims including assessment and referral.
1526 Webb University Center
Norfolk, VA 23529
757-683-4401 (office)

Student Health Services - confidential medical care for sexual assault victims (not including evidence collection) by appointment or as a walk-in.
1007 Webb Center
Norfolk, VA 23529
757-683-3132

Office of Student Conduct and Academic Integrity - receive assistance regarding student conduct policy/procedure related questions and hearing information, request a no contact order, and place to report violations of the student code of conduct.
2124 Monarch Hall
757-683-3431

Student Outreach & Support (S.O.S.) - receive assistance regarding class matters, administrative, academic or personal roadblocks.
2008 Webb Center
757-683-3442

Office of Institutional Equity and Diversity/Title IX Coordinator - obtain information and/or file a Title IX complaint. This office investigates complaints of sexual harassment, sexual assault, gender bias and other forms of sexual misconduct.
4111 Monarch Way, Suite 106
757-683-3141


Off-campus resources for active military and student veterans

Navy Family Advocacy Program - Norfolk program for Navy families, counseling, support, advocacy and crisis intervention

DoD Safe Helpline 877-995-5247; NSN Victim Advocate Duty Phone 757-438-3504; NSN SARC Duty Phone 757-650-6018

Army Sexual Harassment Assistance Line - 1-800-267-9964

HER Shelter - Portsmouth domestic violence hotline, counseling and emergency shelter.
757-251-0144 (hotline), 757-485-1445 (office)

National Sexual Assault Hotline - connect instantly to the nearest community rape treatment center.
1-800-656-HOPE

YWCA Sexual & Domestic Violence Services - sexual assault and relationship/domestic violence support, counseling, education, emergency shelter and legal advocacy
757-251-0144 (24-hour hotline), 757-625-4248 (office)

Samaritan House - Virginia Beach domestic violence shelter, hotline, counseling and services
757-430-2120 (hotline), 757-631-0710 (office)

Sentara Norfolk General Hospital - medical care for sexual assault victims that includes evidence collection.
24-hour emergency services, 757-388-3000 or 911

Chesapeake Forensics - medical care for sexual assault victims that includes evidence collection.
24-hour emergency services, 1101 Madison Plaza, Ste 103, Chesapeake, VA 757-398-5105


International Students

Serving international students

The number of international students in the U.S. has quadrupled to nearly 800,000 since the early 1970s. Similarly, at ODU there has been a significant change in the international student body over the past several years. International students may experience adjustment difficulties due to:

  • Language
  • Cultural barriers to meaningful interactions with U.S. students
  • Lack of support network
  • Pressures regarding high academic expectations
  • Lack of financial resources


These factors could lead to an increased potential of being victimized. For example, the concept of consent could be exploited when an international student is asked if they would like to watch "Netflix and chill". This is a code word (euphemism) for sex.


Concerns:

  • Strong loyalty binds to race, culture, nationality, and family.
  • Cultural and/or religious beliefs that restrain the survivor from leaving the abusive relationship or involving outsiders.
  • Distrust of law enforcement, the criminal justice system, and social services.
  • Lack of service providers that look like the survivor or share common experiences.
  • Lack of culturally and linguistically appropriate services.
  • Lack of trust based on a history of racism and classism in the United States
  • Fear that their experience will reflect on or confirm the stereotypes placed on their nationality.
  • Assumptions of providers based on ethnicity or nationality.
  • Attitudes and stereotypes about the prevalence of violence and/or how women are treated in their home country.
  • Legal status in the U.S. of the survivor and/or the perpetrator.


We recognize that any of these concerns may stop an international student from reaching out for assistance. However, the Women's Center is committed to providing accessible, free, culturally competent, and confidential services to all international students.


On-campus resources for international students

Women's Center - sexual and relationship violence victim advocacy, crisis intervention, education and outreach.
1000 Webb Center, 757-683-4111

Student Health Services - confidential medical care for sexual assault victims (not including evidence collection) by appointment or as a walk-in.
1007 Webb Center, 757-683-3132

Counseling Services - confidential and supportive counseling for sexual assault, dating/domestic violence and stalking victims including assessment and referral.
1526 Webb Center, 757-683-4401

Student Outreach & Support (S.O.S.) - receive assistance regarding class matters, administrative, academic, or personal roadblocks.
2008 Webb Center, 757-683-3442

Office of Student Conduct and Academic Integrity - receive assistance regarding student conduct policy/procedure related questions and hearing information, request a no contact order, and place to report violations of the student code of conduct.
2124 Monarch Hall 757-683-3431

Safe Space Committee - strives to reduce homophobia, transphobia and heterosexism in the Old Dominion University Community.

Office of Institutional Equity and Diversity/Title IX Coordinator - obtain information and/or file a Title IX complaint. This office investigates complaints of sexual harassment, sexual assault, gender bias and other forms of sexual misconduct.
4111 Monarch Way, Suite 106, 757-683-3141

Office of Educational Accessibility- works collaboratively with students, faculty, and staff to ensure that students who experience disabilities are able to successfully access and participate in all aspects of University life.
1021 Student Success Center, 757-683-4655

Office of Intercultural Relations - The Office of Intercultural Relations strives to reduce homophobia, transphobia, and heterosexism in the Old Dominion University community through educational and interactive programming, mentorship, and LGBT advocacy.
1200 Webb University Center, 757-683-4406 (office)


Local/national resources for international students

YWCA Sexual & Domestic Violence Services - sexual assault and relationship/domestic violence support, counseling, education, emergency shelter and legal advocacy
Address, 757-251-0144 (24-hour hotline), 757-625-4248 (office)

HER Shelter - Portsmouth domestic violence hotline, counseling and emergency shelter.
757-251-0144 (hotline), 757-485-1445 (office)

Transitions Family Violence Services - Hampton hotline and shelter, support groups advocacy.
757-723-7774 (hotline), 757-722-2261 (office) -4248 (office)

The Genieve Shelter - Suffolk domestic violence shelter, hotline, counseling advocacy.
1-800-969-HOPE, 757-925-4365

Samaritan House - Virginia Beach domestic violence shelter, hotline, counseling and services
757-430-2120 (hotline), 757-631-0710 (office)

Sentara Norfolk General Hospital - medical care for sexual assault victims that includes evidence collection.
24-hour emergency services, 757-388-3000 or 911

Chesapeake Forensics - medical care for sexual assault victims that includes evidence collection.
24-hour emergency services, 1101 Madison Plaza, Ste 103, Chesapeake, VA 757-398-5105

National Sexual Assault Hotline - connect instantly to the nearest community rape treatment center.
1-800-656-HOPE


LGBTQIA Students

Serving LGBTQIA students

The impact of sexual violence including stalking, domestic violence, and relationship abuse affects all people no matter their identity. However, LGBTQIA people have several special considerations when coping with relationship abuse, sexual assault, and stalking. In fact, it is estimated that between 25 and 33 percent of LGBTQIA relationships include abuse, a rate equal to that of heterosexual and cisgender relationships. There is a misconception that if violence occurs in an LGBTQIA relationship it is always mutual fighting and that it does not reflect the same power and control issues as seen in heterosexual relationships.

The Women's Center recognizes these differences and is committed to serving LGBTQIA people by providing accessible, free, culturally competent, and confidential advocacy and direct services to all survivors and their allies. The Women's Center works in collaboration with the Safe Space Committee to work help reduce homophobia, transphobia, and heterosexism in the Old Dominion University community.

Statistics

Intimate partner violence can happen to anyone. According to the 2010 National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey, "bisexual women experienced significantly higher lifetime prevalence of rape and other sexual violence by an intimate partner when compared to heterosexual women" and "significantly higher lifetime prevalence of rape, physical violence, and/or stalking by an intimate partner when compared to lesbian and heterosexual women."

Some studies indicate that between 20 and 35 percent of LGBTQIA couples experience domestic violence.

According to another study, 50 percent of transgender people surveyed had been hit by a primary partner after coming out as transgender. LGBTQIA youth report a 30 percent incidence of dating violence, compared to 9 percent for heterosexual students.

M.L. Walters, J. Chen, and M.J. Breiding, 2013, The National Intimate Partner and Sexual Violence Survey: 2010 Findings on Victimization by Sexual Orientation, Atlanta, GA: National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 18-20, accessed Dec. 13, 2013

Concerns

While many aspects of LGBTQIA relationship abuse are similar to those experienced by heterosexual victims, it is not in all ways identical. Perpetrators often attempt highly specific forms of abuse based on identity and community dynamics, some of which include:

  • "Outing" or threatening to out a partner's sexual orientation or gender identity to family, friends, employers, or in other situations where this disclosure may pose a threat.
  • Telling the survivor that abusive behavior is a "normal" part of LGBTQIA relationships, or that it cannot be relationship violence because it is occurring between LGBTQIA individuals.
  • Manipulating friends and family supports as well as generating sympathy and trust in order to cut off these resources to the survivor.
  • Portraying the violence as mutual and even consensual, especially if the partner attempts to defend against it, or as an expression of masculinity or some other "desirable" trait.
  • Interfering with hormones their partner is taking to transition, or forcing their partner to transition, interfering with insurance, or medical provider visits/appointments.
  • Pressure not to report violence to avoid bringing increased stigma or conflict to the community.

On-campus resources for LGBTQIA students

Safe Space Committee - strives to reduce homophobia, transphobia and heterosexism in the Old Dominion University Community.

Women's Center - sexual and relationship violence victim advocacy, crisis intervention, education and outreach.
1000 Webb Center, 757-683-4111

Student Health Services - confidential medical care for sexual assault victims (not including evidence collection) by appointment or as a walk-in.
1007 Webb Center, 757-683-3132

Counseling Services - confidential and supportive counseling for sexual assault, dating/domestic violence and stalking victims including assessment and referral.
1526 Webb Center, 757-683-4401

Student Outreach & Support (S.O.S.) - receive assistance regarding class matters, administrative, academic, or personal roadblocks.
2008 Webb Center, 757-683-3442

Office of Student Conduct and Academic Integrity - receive assistance regarding student conduct policy/procedure related questions and hearing information, request a no contact order, and place to report violations of the student code of conduct
2124 Monarch Hall, 757-683-3431

Office of Institutional Equity and Diversity/Title IX Coordinator - harassment, sexual assault, gender bias and other forms of sexual misconduct.
4111 Monarch Way, Suite 106, 757-683-3141

Intercultural Relations - The Office of Intercultural Relations strives to reduce homophobia, transphobia, and heterosexism in the Old Dominion University community through educational and interactive programming, mentorship, and LGBT advocacy.
1200 Webb University Center, 757-683-4406 (office

ODU Sexuality and Gender Alliance (SAGA) - ODU Sexuality and Gender Alliance is the student organizations at Old Dominion University offering a variety of programs to encourage LGBTQIA+ awareness on campus.


Local and Virginia resources for LGBTQIA students

LGBTQ Partner Abuse and Sexual Assault Helpline - Virginia statewide helpline
1-866-356-6998

PFLAG Virginia Beach
Corporation Lane Ste 243 Virginia Beach, VA 23452
beachpflag@gmail.com

Planned Parenthood - Newtown Health Center
515 Newtown Road Virginia Beach VA 23562
757-499-7526

LGBT Life Center - provides resources, advocacy, and counseling
757-640-0929

  • Court One Location:
    248 W. 24th St. Norfolk, VA 23517
  • Granby Location:
    3309 Granby St. Norfolk, VA 235044

Eastern Regional AIDS Resource and Consultation Center, EVMS
Smith Rogers Hall 358 Mowbray Arch, Suite 106, Norfolk VA 23507
757-446-6170
erarcc@evms.edu

PFLAG Norfolk/ South Hampton Roads
247 W. 25th St. Norfolk, VA, 23517
757-640-0929

YWCA
757-625-4248


National resources for LGBTQIA students

Forge
Forge provides peer support to transgender individuals and local Significant Others, Friends, Family, and Allies (SOFFAs).

The LGBTQ Institute on IPV
The institute increases public awareness and enhances state, local and national efforts to prevent and address LGBTQ intimate partner violence. The institute focuses on shaping policy, conducting research, and identifying best practices for preventing and intervening in LGBTQ intimate partner violence.

The NW Network
The NW Network increases our communities' ability to support the self-determination and safety of bisexual, transgender, lesbian and gay survivors of abuse through education, organizing, and advocacy. The NW Network offers support for survivors and community engagement and education.

The Network La Red
The Network La Red is a survivor-led, social justice organization that works to end partner abuse in lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, SM, polyamorous, and queer communities. Rooted in anti-oppression principles, their work aims to create a world where all people are free from oppression. TNLR focuses on organizing, education, and the provision of support services.

National Coalition of Anti-Violence Programs (NCAVP)
NCAVP is a national coalition of local member programs, affiliate organizations, and individual affiliates working towards creating systemic and social change. NCAVP produces two annual national reports on LGBTQ Hate Violence & Intimate Partner Violence.


Male Students

Serving male students

The impact of interpersonal violence (stalking, relationship abuse, and sexual violence) effects all people regardless of their identity.

When sexual assault occurs it is devastating to the victim regardless of sex and/or gender. Male victims have the same rights under the law as women. Men are entitled to the same services and support following a sexual assault. Survivors of sexual violence often blame themselves for the attack(s). Men, in particular, may feel that they should have been strong enough to defend themselves against the assault. They may feel that a "real man" could have avoided the sexual assault. It is important to help victims understand that they are not to blame. Sexual violence is a crime of power and control and perpetrators use many methods to control their victims, including fear, shame, threats, and debilitating substances like alcohol and drugs. The Women's Center recognizes these differences and is committed to male victims by providing accessible, free, culturally competent, and confidential advocacy to all survivors and their allies.


Statistics

A 2005 study conducted by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, on San Diego Kaiser Permanente HMO members, reported that 16% of males were sexually abused by the age of 18.

A 2003 national study of U.S. adults reported that 14.2% of men were sexually abused before the age of 18.

A 1998 study reviewing research on male childhood sexual abuse concluded that the problems are "common, under-reported, under-recognized, and under-treated."

A 1996 study of male university students in the Boston area reported that 18% of men were sexually abused before the age of 16.

Though these statistics are alarming, it is important to note that they probably do not show the full scope of the problem because men are less likely than women to report violence.


Concerns

Male victims may face unique hurdles in reporting the crime and getting the medical assistance and emotional support they need and deserve. Male sexual assault survivors may believe that the police, medical professionals, and even sexual assault support center advocates will be insensitive to their experience because they are men.

Male rape victims suffer and feel similar fear that female rape victims face -- that people will believe the myth that they may have enjoyed being raped. Some men may believe they were not raped or that they gave consent because they became sexually aroused, had an erection, or ejaculated during the sexual assault. These are normal, involuntary physiological reactions. It does not mean that the survivor wanted to be raped or sexually assaulted, or that the survivor enjoyed the traumatic experience. Sexual arousal does not necessarily mean there was consent.

There are many reasons that male victims do not come forward and report being raped, but perhaps the biggest reason for many males is the fear of being perceived as homosexual. However, male sexual assault has nothing to do with the sexual orientation of the attacker or the victim, just as a sexual assault does not make the victim/survivor gay, bisexual or heterosexual. It is a violent crime that affects heterosexual men as much as LGBTQ+ men.

ODU Counseling Services and the YWCA provides counseling and support services for men.


On-campus resources for male students

Women's Center - sexual and relationship violence victim advocacy, education, and outreach.
1000 Webb University Center
Norfolk, VA 23529
757-683-4109 (office)
757-683-4111 (advocate)
womenctr@odu.edu

Counseling Center - confidential and supportive counseling for sexual assault, dating/domestic violence and stalking victims including assessment and referral.
1526 Webb University Center
Norfolk, VA 23529
757-683-4401

Student Health Services - confidential medical care for sexual assault victims (not including evidence collection) by appointment or as a walk-in.
1007 Webb Center
757-683-3132

Office of Student Conduct and Academic Integrity - receive assistance regarding student conduct policy/procedure related questions and hearing information, request a no contact order, and place to report violations of the student code of conduct
2124 Monarch Hall
757-683-3431

Student Outreach & Support (S.O.S.) - receive assistance regarding class matters, administrative, academic or personal roadblocks.
2008 Webb Center
757-683-3442

Office of Institutional Equity and Diversity/Title IX Coordinator - obtain information and/or file a Title IX complaint. This office investigates complaints of sexual harassment, sexual assault, gender bias and other forms of sexual misconduct.
4111 Monarch Way, Suite 106
757-683-3141


Off-campus resources for male students

National Sexual Assault Hotline - connect instantly to the nearest community rape treatment center.
1-800-656-HOPE

YWCA Sexual & Domestic Violence Services - sexual assault and relationship/domestic violence support, counseling, education, emergency shelter and legal advocacy
757-251-0144 (24-hour hotline), 757-625-4248 (office)

The Genieve Shelter - Suffolk domestic violence shelter, hotline, counseling advocacy.
1-800-969-HOPE, 757-925-4365

Samaritan House - Virginia Beach domestic violence shelter, hotline, counseling and services
757-430-2120 (hotline), 757-631-0710 (office)

Virginia Family Violence and Sexual Assault Hotline - statewide hotline
1-800-838-8238

Sentara Norfolk General Hospital - medical care for sexual assault victims that includes evidence collection.
24-hour emergency services, 757-388-3000 or 911

Chesapeake Forensics - medical care for sexual assault victims that includes evidence collection.
24-hour emergency services, 1101 Madison Plaza, Ste 103, Chesapeake, VA 757-398-5105


Students of Color

Serving students of color

The impact of interpersonal violence (stalking, relationship abuse, and sexual violence) effects all people regardless of their identity. However, survivors of color often face a lack of culturally or racially appropriate services as well as supportive resources in diverse languages.

The Women's Center provides advocacy, services and programs for everyone.

People of color may have experienced racism in the past, and this may cause them to distrust the institutions that are designed to help survivors. At hospitals or police stations, people of color may be treated with less respect or less priority than white people and may face even more victim-blaming and disbelief than white people do at the same institutions.

The Women's Center recognizes this dynamic and is committed to serving survivors of color by providing accessible, free, culturally competent, and confidential advocacy and direct services to all survivors and their allies.


Concerns

Each community of color has challenges and circumstances that are unique to its community. However, there are common factors that account for many of the barriers survivors of color face as they seek help.

  • Cultural and/or religious beliefs that restrain the survivor from leaving the abusive relationship or involving outsiders.
  • Strong loyalty binds to race, culture, and family.
  • Distrust of law enforcement, the criminal justice system, and social services.
  • Lack of service providers that look like the survivor or share common experiences.
  • Lack of culturally and linguistically appropriate services.
  • Lack of trust based on a history of racism and classism in the United States.
  • Fear that their experience will reflect on or confirm the stereotypes placed on their ethnicity.
  • Assumptions of providers based on ethnicity.
  • Attitudes and stereotypes about the prevalence of domestic violence and sexual assault in communities of color.
  • Legal status in the U.S. of the survivor and/or the perpetrator.

Statistics

African American females experience intimate partner violence at a rate 35% higher than that of white females, and about 2.5 times the rate of women of other races, however, they are less likely than white women to use social services, battered women's programs, or go to the hospital because of domestic violence.

Source: Women of Color and Reproductive Justice: African American Women


In a study conducted by the Asian Task Force against Domestic Violence, 47% of Cambodians interviewed said they knew of a woman who experienced domestic violence.

According to NVAWS, 37.5% of Native American women are victimized by IPV in a lifetime, defined by rape, physical assault, or stalking.

Source: National Crime against Women Survey, 2006


48% of Latinas in one study reported that their partner's violence against them had increased since they immigrated to the US.

Source: Dutton, Mary; Leslye Orloff, and Giselle Aguilar Hass. 2000, Characteristics of help-seeking behaviors, resources, and services needs of battered immigrant Latinas: Legal and Policy Implications. Georgetown Journal on Poverty Law and Policy. 7(2)


On-campus resources for students of color

Women's Center - sexual and relationship violence victim advocacy, crisis intervention, education, and outreach.
1000 Webb Center, 757-683-4109

Office of Intercultural Relations - works to connect with you for your academic as well as social needs, comfort in this time of stress and transition, and remind you that we are here, and we care about you.
1200 Webb University Center, 757-683-4406

Student Health Services - confidential medical care for sexual assault victims (not including evidence collection) by appointment or as a walk-in.
1007 Webb Center, 757-683-3132

Counseling Services - confidential and supportive counseling for sexual assault, dating/domestic violence and stalking victims including assessment and referral.
1526 Webb University Center, 757-683-4401

Student Outreach & Support (S.O.S.) - receive assistance regarding class matters, administrative, academic or personal roadblocks.
2008 Webb Center, 757-683-3442

Office of Student Conduct and Academic Integrity - receive assistance regarding student conduct policy/procedure related questions and hearing information, request a no contact order, and place to report violations of the student code of conduct
2124 Monarch Hall, 757-683-3431

Safe Space Committee - strives to reduce homophobia, transphobia and heterosexism in the Old Dominion University Community.

Office of Institutional Equity and Diversity/Title IX Coordinator - obtain information and/or file a Title IX complaint. This office investigates complaints of sexual harassment, sexual assault, gender bias and other forms of sexual misconduct.
4111 Monarch Way, Suite 106, 757-683-3141

Office of Educational Accessibility- works collaboratively with students, faculty, and staff to ensure that students who experience disabilities are able to successfully access and participate in all aspects of University life.
1021 Student Success Center, 757-683-4655


National resources for students of color

Women of Color Network (WOCN)
The Women of Color Network (WOCN), a project of the National Resource Center on Domestic Violence (NRCDV) is a national grassroots initiative dedicated to building the capacity of women of color advocates and activists responding to violence against women in communities of color. Through trainings, technical assistance, and advocacy, WOCN helps foster Women of Color in the advancement of their anti-violence work and leadership.

Black Women's Blueprint
The Black Women's Blueprint is an organization that works toward creating a world where Black women and girls are fully empowered and where gender, race and other disparities are erased. In addition to conducting research and engaging in advocacy and activism, Black Women's Blueprint has a hotline for Black women who have been impacted by interpersonal violence. They provide crisis intervention, individual counseling, support groups and more.

Ujima
Ujima is the third principle of Kwanzaa and means "collective work and responsibility." The organization works to end violence against Black women by providing research literature, blogs, articles, trainings and other forms of education that help uplift its mission. Ujima can also help survivors connect with culturally specific resources and organizations that meet the needs of the Black community, and is developing a detailed resource guide.

National Organization of Asians and Pacific Islanders Ending Sexual Violence (NAPIESV)
NAPIESV works to center the experiences of Asian and Pacific Islander survivors and end violence in the community. It also works to connect create a network with other API survivor organizations across the United States and connect survivors with those organizations.

Saheli
Saheli provides interpersonal violence support, advocacy and healins services to South Asian women in English as well as Bengali, Gujarati, Hindi, Kannada, Marathi, Punjabi, Sindhi, Tamil, Telugu, Urdu, Nepali and Arabic. They have a confidential helpline serviced by trained advocates and can also provide legal and social services.

Mending the Sacred Hoop
Mending the Sacred Hoop is an organization based in Minnesota that works with Indigenous communities nationally to end domestic violence, sexual assault, and sex trafficking against Indigenous peoples while also restoring the safety, sovreignty, and sacredness of Native women.

StrongHearts Native Helpline
The StrongHearts Native Helpline provides confidential advocacy and support for Indigenous and Alaska Native people who are experiencing domestic or sexual violence. It operates from 7am to 10pm CT.






* Content adapted from the University of New Hampshire Sexual Harassment & Rape Prevention Program

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